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The NFL Draft has become a spectacle that had, until uncommon circumstances this year, drawn hundreds of thousands of fans to cities across the United States of America in recent years. CBS Sports decided to pay homage to the process by coming up with the all-time NFL Draft class (i.e., the best player taken with each selection) post-NFL merger in 1970. 

Carve out some time in your afternoon to digest this lengthy read. Without any further ado, let’s get started.

No. 1: Peyton Manning, QB, Tennessee (1998)

Drafted team: Colts

If Manning’s career did not run parallel to arguably the most dominant dynasty in football history, he likely would have had a few more Super Bowl victories to his name. With a few more Super Bowls, his argument as the best quarterback of all time would grow stronger. 

No. 2: Lawrence Taylor, LB, North Carolina (1981)

Drafted team: Giants

Linebacker was viewed as a luxury position when the Giants selected Taylor. It worked out superbly as he compiled 10 Pro Bowl appearances and eight first-team All-Pro selections throughout his career. The former Tar Heel tallied 132.5 sacks over the course of his career.

No. 3 overall: Barry Sanders, RB, Oklahoma State (1989)

Drafted team: Lions

It was incredibly difficult to choose Sanders over Anthony Munoz, but it had to be done. Not all heroes wear capes. Despite a shortened career, Sanders was named to 10 Pro Bowls. He compiled 15,269 rushing yards and 99 rushing touchdowns as well as 352 receptions, 2,921 receiving yards and 10 receiving touchdowns

No. 4 overall: Walter Payton, RB, Jackson State (1975)

Drafted team: Bears

Guard John Hannah and linebacker Derrick Thomas would be worthwhile considerations here as well. Payton is one of the most recognized NFL athletes in history. He accumulated nearly 17,000 rushing yards as well as nine Pro Bowl selections throughout his career. 

No. 5 overall: Deion Sanders, CB, Florida State (1989)

Drafted team: Falcons

It was essentially a coin toss between LaDainian Tomlinson and Sanders. It is more complicated attempting to quantify Sanders’ illustrious career. In addition to his time served as a professional baseball player, the former Seminole recorded 53 interceptions and appeared in eight Pro Bowls.

No.6 overall: Walter Jones, OT, Florida State (1997)

Drafted team: Seahawks

Jones is regarded as one of the most dominant offensive tackles to play the game. His size was imposing. He started every game in which he played. His success correlated with nine Pro Bowl appearances as well as recognition on the NFL’s 100th Anniversary All-Time Team. 

No. 7 overall: Adrian Peterson, RB, Oklahoma (2007)

Drafted team: Vikings

Champ Bailey is another worthwhile candidate here but Peterson has done almost as much in a smaller sample size. He has four first-team All-Pro selections as well as seven Pro Bowl appearances. Still active, Peterson has accumulated over 14,000 rushing yards during a time that has become known for its progressive passing attacks. 

No. 8 overall: Ronnie Lott, DB, USC (1981)

Drafted team: 49ers

Lott dominated the game physically from 1981-94. He appeared in 10 Pro Bowls and was honored as a first-team All-Pro on six different occasions. The California native was a member of four Super Bowl champions and has since walked into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. 

No. 9 overall: Bruce Matthews, OG, USC (1983)

Drafted team: Oilers

Matthews played the game at a high level for 19 seasons, so he gets the nod over the likes of Brian Urlacher and Dick Butkus. Over the course of his career, the lineman appeared in 14 Pro Bowls, which is tied for the most by any player, and was a first-team All-Pro seven times. 

No. 10 overall: Rod Woodson, DB, Purdue (1987)

Drafted team: Steelers

Woodson was an imposing figure on that vaunted Steelers defense. He accumulated 71 interceptions and 13.5 sacks over the course of his career. The NFL welcomed him to 11 Pro Bowls in addition to being named a first-team All-Pro six times. He has since been inducted into the Pro Bowl Hall of Fame. 

No. 11 overall: Michael Irvin, WR, Miami (1988)

Drafted team: Cowboys

Paul Warfield is probably the most valuable player to be selected at No. 11 overall, but pre-merger rules exclude him from consideration. Ben Roethlisberger could have been considered, as he plays the most valuable position and has been playing longer than Irvin. The verbose pass catcher has been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. 

No. 12 overall: Warren Sapp, DT, Miami (1995)

Drafted team: Buccaneers

Sapp was a gap-seeking missile throughout his career. He tallied 96.5 sacks en route to seven Pro Bowl appearances and four first-team All-Pro honors. He is recognized as one of the most difficult defenders to block and was quickly inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. 

No. 13 overall: Franco Harris, RB, Penn State (1972)

Drafted team: Steelers

Harris was a vicious runner, similar to Jim Brown. He compiled over 12,000 rushing yards and 91 touchdowns. He narrowly beat out Tony Gonzalez at this spot, but Gonzalez played much longer. Harris was a member of four Super Bowl championship teams and has since been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. 

No. 14 overall: Jim Kelly, QB, Miami (1983)

Drafted team: Bills

Kelly was a rifleman in his day. He threw for over 35,000 yards and made five Pro Bowl appearances in his career. The Pro Football Hall of Fame opened their doors for Kelly in 2002 after leading the acclaimed K-Gun offense. 

No. 15 overall: Derrick Johnson, LB, Texas (2005)

Drafted team: Chiefs

Johnson was one of the most consistent, productive players throughout his career. He was named a first-team All-Pro once in his career and was also named to the Pro Bowl on four separate occasions. Johnson continued playing until finally announcing his retirement following the 2018 season. 

No. 16 overall: Jerry Rice, WR, Mississippi Valley State (1985)

Drafted team: 49ers

There is no room for discussion here. Rice has a strong claim as the NFL’s best wide receiver of all-time. He is considered one of the greatest players to ever wear an NFL jersey. Over the course of his career, he amassed 1,549 receptions for 22,895 and 197 touchdowns. He was named first-team All-Pro 10 times and was selected to the Pro Bowl 13 times. 

No. 17 overall: Emmitt Smith, RB, Florida (1990)

Drafted team: Cowboys

Smith is the league’s all-time leading rusher with 18,355 yards. He played during a period that was hotly contested but his longevity superseded the rest. He was named to the Pro Bowl eight times and was a four-time first-team All-Pro selection on three Super Bowl champion teams.

No. 18 overall: Art Monk, WR, Syracuse (1980)

Drafted team: Redskins

Monk is the only Hall of Fame player to be taken No. 18 overall in the post-merger era. Honestly, Joe Flacco was probably the closest player to taking this spot from Monk. No. 18 is a surprisingly unimpressive pick all-time. Monk made three Pro Bowl appearances and caught nearly 13,000 yards worth of passes.

No. 19 overall: Marvin Harrison, WR, Syracuse (1996)

Drafted team: Colts

A little run for Syracuse receivers here. Harrison was Peyton Manning’s favorite wide receiver in Indianapolis. The two linked up early and often. Harrison caught nearly 15,000 yards as well as 128 touchdowns. He appeared in eight Pro Bowls and was named first-team All-Pro three times before being honored by the Pro Football Hall of Fame. 

No. 20 overall: Jack Youngblood, DE, Florida (1971)

Drafted team: Rams

Youngblood barely fit the criteria because he was drafted in 1971. The edge rusher made seven Pro Bowl appearances and was named first-team All-Pro five times. Youngblood, as well as Steve Atwater who was also considered at this pick, has been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. 

No. 21 overall: Randy Moss, WR, Marshall (1998)

Drafted team: Vikings

Where would NFL history be without “straight cash, homie?” Moss was known for his on-field antics as much as his posterizing catches down the sideline. He surpassed 15,000 career receiving yards en route to six Pro Bowl appearances and four first-team All-Pro honors. He would go on to play for the Raiders and the Patriots.

No. 22 overall: Hanford Dixon, DB, Southern Mississippi (1981)

Drafted team: Browns

Dixon is one of the men credited for instituting the “Dawg Pound” moniker that has become synonymous with Browns football. A talented player in his own right, Dixon made three Pro Bowl appearances and was named first-team All-Pro twice during nine seasons of play.

No. 23 overall: Ty Law, CB, Michigan (1995)

Drafted team: Patriots

Law was one of the first defensive weapons for Bill Belichick in New England. The established coach trusted Law and used him in a variety of ways. The three-time Super Bowl champion flew all over the field as he introduced himself to a national audience. Law, who has since been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, was named to five Pro Bowls and was first-team All-Pro twice.

No. 24 overall: Ed Reed, DB, Miami (2002)

Drafted team: Ravens

Aaron Rodgers could make a convincing argument to be in this position now, and he has a great chance to take over by the time he retires. It is painful to consider leaving Reed off this list. He was such a fun player in the way that he covered the secondary. The free safety was fluid and dared opposing quarterbacks to throw in his direction. He made nine Pro Bowl appearances, which is one more than Rodgers as of now.

No. 25 overall: Ted Washington, DT, Louisville (1991)

Drafted team: 49ers

Washington was a mountain of a human being. He was a true nose tackle in every description of the position. He demanded a double team, which would create more opportunities for his teammates. Washington made four Pro Bowl appearances and was named a first-team All-Pro once.

No. 26 overall: Ray Lewis, LB, Miami (1996)

Drafted team: Ravens

Lewis went to Miami. He may have mentioned that once or twice in interviews. Baltimore had a truly terrifying defense with Lewis and Reed. The former made 13 Pro Bowl appearances and seven first-team All-Pro teams during his illustrious career. His introduction dance is still one of the most imitated in sports. 

No. 27 overall: Dan Marino, QB, Pittsburgh (1983)

Drafted team: Dolphins

Marino is not talked about in the same manner as Joe Montana or Tom Brady because he never won a Super Bowl, but the nine-time Pro Bowl selection remains one of the most accurate quarterbacks in league history. He threw for over 61,000 yards and 420 touchdowns. 

No. 28 overall: Derrick Brooks, LB, Florida State (1995)

Drafted team: Buccaneers

Brooks had a lengthy career in the heart of Tampa Bay’s defense. He served as the weak-side linebacker when the Buccaneers were making the Tampa 2 popular again. Brooks made 11 Pro Bowl appearances and was named a first-team All-Pro five times. He has been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. 

No. 29 overall: Steve Wisniewski, OG, Penn State (1989)

Drafted team: Cowboys

Wisniewski made eight Pro Bowl appearances over the course of 13 NFL seasons. He started every game in which he played. He was also named a first-team All-Pro twice. The Wiz was immediately traded from Dallas to the Raiders. 

No. 30 overall: Reggie Wayne, WR, Miami (2001)

Drafted team: Colts

The third piece to Indianapolis’ passing attack joins the party. Manning and Harrison opened the door for Wayne, who would have his own productive career. He appearances in six Pro Bowls and recorded over 14,000 receiving yards. He was named a first-team All-Pro once in his career. 

No. 31 overall: Cameron Heyward, DL, Ohio State (2011)

Drafted team: Steelers

Heyward’s career is ongoing but he should become the most productive player to be picked at No. 31 overall. Travis Frederick could have surpassed him if he had continued his career,  which was unfortunately cut short. Heyward has made three Pro Bowl appearances and was twice named first-team All-Pro since being drafted in 2011. 

No. 32 overall: Drew Brees, QB, Purdue (2001)

Drafted team: Chargers

Brees’ career began in San Diego, but he flourished with New Orleans. The veteran quarterback should eclipse 80,000 passing yards this season as he see-saws back and forth with Tom Brady. Brees has never won the league’s MVP award and has been named a first-team All-Pro just once thanks in part to the timing of his career. He has, however, made 13 Pro Bowl appearances.

No. 33 overall: Brett Favre, QB, Southern Mississippi (1991)

Drafted team: Falcons

Green Bay has been able to get three decades of good quarterback play out of Favre and Aaron Rodgers. Favre was named to 11 Pro Bowls over the course of his career and led the Packers to one Super Bowl victory. He has since walked into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

No. 34 overall: Jack Ham, LB, Penn State (1971)

Drafted team: Steelers

Ham is one of the least discussed but most impactful linebackers in NFL history. From 1971-82, he made eight Pro Bowl appearances and was named first-team All-Pro six times. The Pro Football Hall of Fame recognized his transcendent play. 

No. 35 overall: Charles Tillman, CB, Louisiana (2003)

Drafted team: Bears

The No. 35 overall selection is one of the weaker competition in the first two rounds. Tillman was a great player but will likely never be voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. His stiffest challenger at No. 35 was Andy Dalton. Tillman, made two Pro Bowl appearances and was named a first-team All-Pro, was so known for creating fumbles that his move earned the name “Peanut Punch,” a reference to his nickname.

No. 36 overall: Tiki Barber, RB, Virginia (1997)

Drafted team: Giants

Barber had ample opportunities to make an impact for the Giants. He accumulated 10,449 rushing yards as well as 5,183 receiving yards. He was named to the Pro Bowl on three instances. Kevin Mawae is honorable mention here as well.

No. 37 overall: Randall Cunningham, QB, UNLV (1985)

Drafted team: Eagles

In addition to nearly 30,000 passing yards, Cunningham also piled up nearly 5,000 rushing yards. He was a dangerous quarterback with a big frame. Cunningham was selected to the Pro Bowl four times and was named a first-team All-Pro once. He has not yet been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

No. 38 overall: Mike Singletary, LB, Baylor (1981)

Drafted team: Bears

Singletary was a nasty player for 12 seasons before bringing his Pro Football Hall of Fame career to a halt. He made 10 Pro Bowl appearances and was named first-team All-Pro seven times. He was a member of the beloved 1985 Bears defense. 

No. 39 overall: Keena Turner, LB, Purdue (1980)

Drafted team: 49ers

Most names are likely recognizable to the average fan, but this is probably not one of them. Turner played 11 seasons but had one Pro Bowl selection to his name. When removing the pre-merger players from the candidate pool, the No. 39 overall selection was short on viable talents. 

No. 40 overall: Michael Strahan, DE, Texas Southern (1993)

Drafted team: Giants

Thurman Thomas was nearly the choice here, but it is impossible to overlook Strahan’s credentials. He made seven Pro Bowl appearances and was named a first-team All-Pro four times. The Texas native led New York to one Super Bowl victory during his decorated career. 

No. 41 overall: Mark Gastineau, DE, Arizona State (1979)

Drafted team: Jets

Gastineau played 10 seasons during which he made five Pro Bowl appearances. He was named a first-team All-Pro three times and accumulated 74 sacks over the course of his career. Andre Tippett and Ken Norton Jr. are a few other players that would have been considered here. 

No. 42 overall: Rob Gronkowski, TE, Arizona (2010)

Drafted team: Patriots

Aaron Hernandez and Gronkowski formed one of the most devastating tight end duos in league history. Gronk played nine seasons before retiring, then announcing his return this offseason. If Gronkowski is able to stay healthy and produce similar numbers, he will have a chance to cement his status the greatest tight end in league history. The Arizona product has five Pro Bowl appearances and four first-team All-Pro selections to his name. 

No. 43 overall: Dan Dierdorf, OT, Michigan (1971)

Drafted team: Michigan

Dierdorf made six Pro Bowl appearances and was named first-team All-Pro three times. The Pro Football Hall of Fame eventually opened their doors for the productive lineman, who has enjoyed a long career as a broadcaster after his playing days, including 15 years for the NFL on CBS.

No. 44 overall: Dermontti Dawson, C, Kentucky (1988)

Drafted team: Steelers

Dawson is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He made seven Pro Bowl appearances and was named a first-team All-Pro six times for the Steelers. 

No. 45 overall: Ricky Watters, RB, Notre Dame (1991)

Drafted team: 49ers

Watters made five Pro Bowl appearances. He accumulated 10,643 rushing yards and 4,248 receiving yards during his career. He started all but two games in which he played, which is pretty remarkable. 

No. 46 overall: Jack Lambert, LB, Kent State (1974)

Drafted team: Steelers

Pittsburgh seems to be really well-represented on this list. Larry Allen was a tantalizing option as well at No. 46. Both he and Lambert were selected first-team All-Pro six times and are in the Hall of Fame. Lambert gets the slight edge for us with this pick, however, with his four Super Bowl titles as well as hardware for winning the 1974 Defensive Rookie of the Year and 1976 Defensive Player of the Year awards.

No. 47 overall: Bobby Wagner, LB, Utah State (2012)

Drafted team: Seahawks

Wagner is one of a handful of active players on this list. He remains one of the most effective linebackers across the league. He has been selected to six Pro Bowls and is a five-time first-team All-Pro. Wagner will only continue to distance himself from the competition. The California native was a member of the Super Bowl XLVIII championship team. 

No. 48 overall: Howie Long, DE, Villanova (1981)

Drafted team: Raiders

Long’s contribution to the game continued beyond his own playing career in the form of his sons, Chris and Kyle Long. The elder rusher made eight Pro Bowl appearances and was twice selected first-team All-Pro. He accumulated 84 sacks over the course of his career. 

No. 49 overall: Roger Craig, RB, Nebraska (1983)

Drafted team: 49ers

The 49ers are another well-represented team on this list. It’s fitting that San Francisco makes our list at No. 49 overall. Craig made four Pro Bowl appearances and was named NFL Offensive Player of the Year in 1988. The NFC franchise won three Super Bowls with the running back on their roster. 

No. 50 overall: Michael Dean Perry, DT, Clemson (1988)

Drafted team: Browns

Perry played 10 seasons in the NFL, making six Pro Bowl appearances during that time. He was also named a first-team All-Pro in two of those seasons. Perry accumulated 61 sacks as an interior pass rusher in his career, with his best season coming in 1990, when he managed not only a career-best 11.5 sacks, but 107 tackles as well.

No. 51 overall: Rickey Jackson, LB, Pittsburgh (1981)

Drafted team: Saints

Jackson was selected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame after being recognized with six Pro Bowl appearances. He accumulated 128 sacks during his career and only came off the bench twice in his 227 games played.

No. 52 overall: Greg Jennings, WR, Western Michigan (2006)

Drafted team: Packers

Jennings played 10 seasons and made a Pro Bowl appearance in two of them. Jennings caught passes from Brett Favre and Aaron Rodgers. One of those campaigns ended with a Super Bowl victory in 2010, the last of three straight seasons in which Jennings racked up at least 1,100 receiving yards.

No. 53 overall: Mel Blount, DB, Southern (1970)

Drafted team: Steelers

Blount was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Five of Blount’s 14 seasons ended with Pro Bowl recognition and two ended with first-team All-Pro honors. He finished his career with 57 interceptions, including a whopping 11 during his breakout 1975 campaign.

No. 54 overall: Anquan Boldin, WR, Florida State (2003)

Drafted team: Cardinals

Boldin really capitalized on his opportunity across from Larry Fitzgerald early in his career, as all three of his Pro Bowl appearances came in Arizona. The former Seminole did have a quality second act in Baltimore, where he won his only Super Bowl title, and San Francisco before playing his final season in Detroit.

No. 55 overall: Andrew Whitworth, OT, LSU (2006)

Drafted team: Bengals

Whitworth has been one of the most underappreciated left tackles in the league for the duration of his career — just look at Cincinnati allowing him to leave in free agency. The left tackle position has been an issue for the Bengals ever since. The lineman has been selected to four Pro Bowls throughout his career as was named first-team All-Pro twice, and he’s still trucking at age 38.

No. 56 overall: Osi Umenyiora, DL, Troy (2003)

Drafted team: Giants

Umenyiora recorded 85 sacks over the course of his career. He was selected to two Pro Bowls and carried on the legacy of Michael Strahan. The London-born player is a two-time Super Bowl champion.

No. 57 overall: Mark Stepnoski, C, Pittsburgh (1989)

Drafted team: Cowboys

Stepnoski made five Pro Bowl appearances in his career. He played for 13 years and started 182 games in a career that started and ended in Dallas but featured a stretch playing for the Houston/Tennessee Oilers as well.

No. 58 overall: Lavonte David, LB, Nebraska (2012)

Drafted team: Buccaneers

David has been one of the most dominant linebackers since entering the NFL in 2012. He has only made one Pro Bowl appearance, which is a travesty. He has also been named first-team All-Pro just once. 

No. 59 overall: Aeneas Williams, DB, Southern (1991)

Drafted team: Cardinals

The Pro Football Hall of Fame recognized Williams with a spot in Canton. He was selected to eight Pro Bowls and was named a first-team All-Pro on three occasions. Williams totaled 55 interceptions in his career with the Cardinals and Rams, returning nine for touchdowns.

No. 60 overall: Pat Swilling, LB, Georgia Tech (1986)

Drafted team: Saints

Swilling’s career finished with five Pro Bowls and two first-team All-Pro selections to his credit as well as 107.5 career sacks. The star pass-rusher earned Defensive Player of the Year honors after racking up 17 sacks in 1991.

No. 61 overall: Brian Dawkins, DB, Clemson (1996)

Drafted team: Eagles

The Eagles franchise was best known for Brian Westbrook, Donovan McNabb and Dawkins in the late ’90s and early 2000s. Dawkins made nine Pro Bowl appearances and was named a four time first-team All-Pro selection while serving as the heart of the Eagles defensive for 13 years then capping his career with a three-year stint in Denver.

No. 62 overall: Casey Hayward, CB, Vanderbilt (2012)

Drafted team: Packers

Hayward’s career is best known for his time with the Chargers, where he had a league-best seven interceptions in 2016, his first season with the club after four years in Green Bay. He has made two Pro Bowl appearances in his career, both with the Chargers.

No. 63 overall: Travis Kelce, TE, Cincinnati (2013)

Drafted team: Chiefs

Kelce is regarded as one of the NFL’s best young tight ends. The Ohio native is coming off a Super Bowl victory with Kansas City after becoming one of Patrick Mahomes’ favorite targets, with 200 receptions for 2,565 yards and 15 touchdowns over the last two seasons.

No. 64 overall: Dan Fouts, QB, Oregon (1973)

Drafted team: Chargers

Fouts was efficient and effective in the Air Coryell system. He threw for over 43,000 yards even before the NFL evolved into a pass-happy league. Fouts was selected to six Pro Bowls, was a two-time first-team All-Pro selection and earned Offensive Player of the Year honors in the strike-shortened 1982 season, which came during his professional peak and prevented the quarterback from padding his final career stats even more.

No. 65 overall: Frank Gore, RB, Miami (2005)

Drafted team: 49ers

Gore could play the role of Father Time because he has set the bar for a running back’s longevity in the NFL. Gore is entering his 16th NFL season and continues to rise up the all-time rushing list. Gore has accumulated over 15,000 rushing yards while making five Pro Bowl appearances.

No. 66 overall: Ronde Barber, DB, Virginia (1997)

Drafted team: Buccaneers

Barber caught 47 interceptions and sacked the opposing quarterback 28 times. He made five Pro Bowl appearances and was named a first-team All-Pro three times. 

No. 67 overall: Ken Anderson, QB, Augustana (1971)

Drafted team: Bengals

Anderson threw for nearly 33,000 over the course of 16 NFL seasons. He made four Pro Bowl appearances and was named a first-team All-Pro in 1981, where he also earned MVP and Offensive Player of the Year honors for a Bengals team that reached the Super Bowl.

No. 68 overall: Lance Briggs, LB, Arizona (2003)

Drafted team: Bears

Briggs made seven Pro Bowl appearances and was named a first-team All-Pro once. Briggs and Brian Urlacher formed one of the best linebacker units in Chicago for a decade. 

No. 69 overall: Jason Witten, TE, Tennessee (2003)

Drafted team: Cowboys

Witten had a long, productive career in Dallas, but it came to an end this offseason. He made 11 Pro Bowl appearances in addition to being named a first-team All-Pro twice. His brief retirement allowed him to pursue a career in sports media, but the itch to play drew him back. 

No. 70 overall: Justin Houston, EDGE, Georgia (2011)

Drafted team: Chiefs

Houston had a standout career in Kansas City before moving on to Indianapolis. He hardly missed a beat as he recorded 11 sacks in his first season in the AFC South. Houston was named to the Pro Bowl four straight times from 2012-15 while also earning first-team All-Pro distinction in 2014, when he piled up a league-best 22 sacks.

No. 71 overall: DeMarco Murray, RB, Oklahoma (2011)

Drafted team: Cowboys

Murray was one of the most productive running backs in the NFL before a highly profitable free agency contract led him to change teams. He had a difficult time getting his career back on course. The former Sooner made three Pro Bowl appearances in addition to being named a first-team All-Pro. 

No. 72 overall: Jeremiah Trotter, LB, S.F. Austin (1998)

Drafted team: Eagles

Trotter played 12 seasons in the NFL and made four Pro Bowl appearances during that time. He had three separate stints with the Eagles sandwiched around short stopovers in Washington and Tampa, but he topped 110 tackles six times in his career while manning the middle of the defense.

No. 73 overall: Jason Taylor, EDGE, Akron (1997)

Drafted team: Dolphins

Taylor accumulated 139.5 career sacks as well as eight interceptions. During his 15 NFL seasons, he was selected to six Pro Bowls in addition to being named a first-team All-Pro three times. Taylor, who was the 2006 Defensive Player of the Year and 2007 Walter Payton Man of the Year, was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2017.

No. 74 overall: Curtis Martin, RB, Pittsburgh (1995)

Drafted team: Patriots

Many likely remember Martin towards the tail end of his career with the Jets, but he was drafted by the rival Patriots. The running back made five Pro Bowl appearances. Will Shields and Steve Smith are other strong candidates for this spot. 

No. 75 overall: Russell Wilson, QB, Wisconsin (2012)

Drafted team: Seahawks

The Seahawks have received nearly a decade of elite quarterback play from Wilson, who has started every game for Seattle since being drafted in the third round. He will likely surpass 30,000 passing yards this season and has been named a Pro Bowl talent six times. In addition to those passing yards, he has nearly 4,000 rushing yards. Wilson has taken the Seahawks to the playoffs in seven of his eight pro seasons and won it all in his second year with the club.

No. 76 overall: Ahman Green, RB, Nebraska (1998)

Drafted team: Seahawks

Green had 9,205 rushing yards and 2,883 receiving yards in his career. He was a formidable rusher in the Green Bay offense alongside Brett Favre. Green played for 12 years but only started more than five games in six of them, despite racking up four Pro Bowl appearances. 

No. 77 overall: Jurrell Casey, DT, USC (2011)

Drafted team: Titans

Casey was traded this offseason but has long been one of the most underrated interior defenders in the NFL. He has accumulated 51 sacks, 84 tackles for loss and five Pro Bowl appearances in his career.

No. 78 overall: Nat Moore, WR, Florida (1974)

Drafted team: Dolphins

Moore had 7,546 receiving yards and 74 receiving touchdowns during his career. 14.5 percent of his career receptions went for a touchdown, which is pretty remarkable. He was named a first-team All-Pro and was selected to the Pro Bowl during a stellar 1977 season that featured a league-best 12 receiving touchdowns, adding one more on the ground.

No. 79 overall: Lyle Alzado, DE, Yankton (1971)

Drafted team: Broncos

Alzado started all but one of his 196 appearances in his career. He went to two Pro Bowls and was a first-team All-Pro twice, but it wasn’t until his third stop that he was able to win a Super Bowl title with the Raiders. Alzado racked up 23 sacks in his final four seasons after the league started officially tracking the statistic.

No. 80 overall: Bill Romanowski, LB, Boston College (1988)

Drafted team: 49ers

Romanowski has a colorful history, but the physical linebacker played the game with supreme effort. He totaled 1,118 tackles and 39.5 sacks en route to two Pro Bowl appearances, and the star defender also racked up four Super Bowl titles as a member of the 49ers in the 1980s and Broncos in the ’90s.

No. 81 overall: Richie Incognito, OG, Oregon (2005)

Drafted team: Rams

Incognito has been a controversial player on and off the field, but he has been one of the most dominant interior offensive linemen in the game during his career. He has started every game in which he has played over the course of 14 seasons. Four of those seasons have ended with Pro Bowl recognition.

No. 82 overall: Joe Montana, QB, Notre Dame (1979)

Drafted team: 49ers

Montana is one of the best quarterbacks of all time. He is a four-time Super Bowl champion and a three-time Super Bowl MVP. He was named to eight Pro Bowls and was a three-time first-team All-Pro during a career that featured 40,551 passing yards and 273 passing touchdowns.

No. 83 overall: Ed McCaffrey, WR, Stanford (1991)

Drafted team: Giants

The father of Panthers running back Christian McCaffrey, Ed was solid and consistent throughout his career. He accumulated 7,422 receiving yards and made one Pro Bowl appearance, and it wasn’t until he got to Denver that he made a name for himself as a star. The receiver won three Super Bowl titles in all, one as a reserve in San Francisco and two with John Elway’s Broncos.

No. 84 overall: Charles Mann, DE, Nevada (1983)

Drafted team: Redskins

Mann recorded 83 sacks during his 12 NFL seasons, which included four Pro Bowl appearances. The three-time Super Bowl winner played a key role for Washington’s title teams in 1987 and 1991, then earned his final ring as a reserve with San Francisco in his final season.

No. 85 overall: Tony Tolbert, DE, UTEP (1989)

Drafted team: Cowboys

Tolbert recorded 59 sacks and started 121 of 144 games played. He earned three Super Bowl titles as a member of the dominant Cowboys teams in the 1990s, but his best season didn’t come until 1996, when he tallied a career-best 12 sacks to earn his first and only trip to the Pro Bowl.

No. 86 overall: Marshal Yanda, OG, Iowa (2007)

Drafted team: Ravens

Yanda, who recently retired, made it to the Pro Bowl eight times while earning two first-team All-Pro selections. Widely recognized as the best interior lineman during his 13 years with Baltimore, Yanda also has one Super Bowl title to his credit.

No. 87 overall: Eric Decker, WR, Minnesota (2010)

Drafted team: Broncos

Decker caught 439 passes for 5,816 yards and 53 touchdowns in his career. He was a journeyman during the twilight of his career, but Decker managed three 1,000-yard seasons during a four-year stretch in his prime with the Broncos and Jets.

No. 88 overall: Danielle Hunter, EDGE, Fresno State (2015)

Drafted team: Vikings

Hunter has been in the league for five years but has already left his mark. He has recorded 54.5 sacks and is hitting the peak of his career. The former Bulldog has been selected to two Pro Bowls. 

No. 89 overall: Terrell Owens, WR, UT-Chattanooga (1996)

Drafted team: 49ers

Owens’ legacy for some may be crying about Tony Romo being his quarterback, doing push-ups in his driveway and telling fans to grab their popcorn. His career was astonishing though. He recorded nearly 16,000 receiving yards as part of a career that included six Pro Bowls and five first-team All-Pro appearances. 

No. 90 overall: Antonio Freeman, WR, Virginia Tech (1995)

Drafted team: Packers

Freeman is in competition with Matt Schaub for the best No. 90 pick ever. The Packers receiver racked up 7,251 receiving yards during his career, and his one first-team All-Pro and Pro Bowl selection came during a monster 1998 season that featured 84 receptions for a league-high 1,424 yards and 14 touchdowns.

No. 91 overall: NaVorro Bowman, LB, Penn State (2010)

Drafted team: 49ers

Brian Westbrook would be the other notable name here, but Bowman has the advantage in All-Pro selections as well as Pro Bowl appearances. The linebacker was able to accomplish a lot in eight seasons, including topping 140 tackles four times.

No. 92 overall: Hines Ward, WR, Georgia (1998)

Drafted team: Steelers

Ward landed on 1,000 career receptions even. T.Y. Hilton was his main competition, and Ward has essentially doubled him up in receiving yards and touchdowns. Ward was a classic example of a love/hate player. If he was on your team, you loved him. If he was on the opposing sideline, you hated him. He would lay out a defender with a smile on his face.

No. 93 overall: Ken Ellis, DB, Southern (1970)

Drafted team: Packers

The defensive back had two Pro Bowl selections and a first-team All-Pro selection while becoming a star with the Packers, but the second half of his career featured stops with five different teams from 1976-79. 

No. 94 overall: Brandon Williams, DT, Missouri Southern (2013)

Drafted team: Ravens

The interior defensive lineman has clogged a lot of gaps, but Williams will never be known for his sack production. He has made one Pro Bowl appearance in his career. 

No. 95 overall: Jimmy Graham, TE, Miami (2010)

Drafted team: Saints

Graham was a heavily utilized pass catcher for Drew Brees before eventually leaving New Orleans. He has made five Pro Bowl appearances and was named a first-team All-Pro for his 16-touchdown performance in 2013. Graham should exceed 8,000 career receiving yards this season after changing teams yet again, this time landing in Chicago.

No. 96 overall: Charles Haley, DE, James Madison (1986)

Drafted team: 49ers

Haley topped 100 career sacks during a career that featured five Pro Bowl trips and two first-team All-Pro designations. The Pro Football Hall of Famer won five Super Bowls during his career, two with San Francisco and three in Dallas.

No. 97 overall: Todd Perry, OG, Kentucky (1993)

Drafted team: Bears

Perry, who started 144 of 165 games played, was a nine-year starter in the league, while no other No. 97 picks have been a primary starter for more than seven seasons. 

No. 98 overall: Rich Gannon, QB, Delaware (1987)

Drafted team: Patriots

Gannon is probably best known for his time with the Raiders but was actually drafted by New England. He appeared in four Pro Bowls and was a two-time first-team All-Pro selection. Gannon, who threw for nearly 30,000 yards in his career, was named MVP in 2002 for racking up a league-best 4,689 yards at the age of 37 when he took the Raiders to the Super Bowl.

No. 99 overall: Joe Theismann, QB, Notre Dame (1971)

Drafted team: Dolphins

Theismann, who made two Pro Bowl appearances in addition to a first-team All-Pro bid, was originally drafted by the Dolphins as well as the Minnesota Twins of Major League Baseball. Washington acquired his rights from Miami, and the rest was history. Theismann, who famously suffered an injury similarly grotesque to the one sustained by Alex Smith, threw for over 25,000 yards in his career, which included a Super Bowl title in 1982 and MVP honors in 1983.

No. 100 overall: Everson Griffen, EDGE, USC (2010)

Drafted team: Vikings

Griffen is still searching for a new NFL team this offseason but his claim to be the best No. 100 overall selection post-merger is sound. He has made four Pro Bowl appearances as a result of his 74.5 sack during his 10 year-career despite not featuring as a starter until his fifth season.

No. 101 overall: Steve Wallace, OT, Auburn (1986)

Drafted team: 49ers

Wallace, who played 12 NFL seasons and made one Pro Bowl appearance, was a primary starter for eight seasons in San Francisco. His first year as a starter came in 1988 when the 49ers went on to win the Super Bowl, and Wallace added two more title rings to his resume by the time he left the Bay Area to play his final season in Kansas City.

No. 102 overall: Kirk Cousins, QB, Michigan State (2012)

Drafted team: Redskins

Cousins was drafted the same year as Robert Griffin III, but it was Cousins who ultimately made more starts in Washington before leaving in free agency to sign a fully-guaranteed deal with the Vikings in 2018. He has made two Pro Bowl appearances in his career, but neither were for the seasons he led the league in completion percentage (2015) or later topped a 70 percent completion rate (2018).

No. 103 overall: Mike Wilson, OT, Georgia (1977)

Drafted team: Bengals

Wilson made 172 starts for the Bengals and Seahawks while mostly playing right tackle as a pro. There were only two games played where he did not start. While the former Bulldog had zero Pro Bowl bids in his career, he did start every game for a 1981 Bengals team that went to the Super Bowl and helped the Seahawks get to the playoffs in two of his four seasons in Seattle at the end of his career.

No. 104 overall: Dwight White, DE, Texas A&M-Commerce (1971)

Drafted team: Steelers

White, who made two Pro Bowl appearances in his career, was part of all four Steelers Super Bowl championship teams in the 1970s. Though his career took place in totality before sacks were an official statistic, “Mad Dog” is credited with nine playoff sacks and even had a safety during the team’s Super Bowl IX win.

No. 105 overall: Harry Carson, LB, South Carolina State (1976)

Drafted team: Giants

Carson made nine Pro Bowl appearances during 13 NFL seasons before being ushered into the Pro Football Hall of Fame after a long career manning the middle of the Giants defense while serving as a team captain for most of his tenure.

No. 106 overall: Tom DeLeone, C, Ohio State (1972)

Drafted team: Bengals

While DeLeone started at least 10 games only six teams in his 13-year career, he did play well enough to earn two Pro Bowl appearances after latching on with the Browns in his third professional season. His second Pro Bowl bid came in 1980, when the Browns won their division after seven straight seasons finishing either third or fourth.

No. 107 overall: Allan Ellis, DB, UCLA (1973)

Drafted team: Bears

Ellis, made one Pro Bowl appearance and recorded 22 career interceptions, really started to come on for the Bears in the mid-1970s with back-to-back six-interceptions seasons before a knee injury derailed his career, causing him to miss his age-27 season. He only had one more season as a full-time starter after that injury but did make an impact for the Bears in 1979, racking up three interceptions in eight games (four starts) and another during the playoffs.

No. 108 overall: Jahri Evans, G, Bloomsburg (2006)

Drafted team: Saints

Well-regarded as one of the best interior linemen in football during his 12-year career, Evans made six Pro Bowl appearances and four first-team All-Pro selections during his time in New Orleans before ending his career with one season in Green Bay.

No. 109 overall: David Bakhtiari, OT, Colorado (2013)

Drafted team: Packers

Bakhtiari’s selection eventually forced Bryan Bulaga over to the right side. He has been one of the most consistent, yet under appreciated linemen in the NFL. Bakhtiari has earned two Pro Bowls and a first-team All-Pro selection so far in seven NFL seasons, but there is plenty of time for him to expand upon his already noteworthy career. 

No. 110 overall: Steve Beuerlein, QB, Notre Dame (1987)

Drafted team: Raiders

Before going on to call NFL games for the NFL on CBS, Beuerlein starred as a quarterback with several teams during his 16-year career. He threw for over 24,000 yards and made one Pro Bowl appearance in 1999 when at age 34 he had a breakout season, leading the league with 4,436 passing yards while also tossing 36 touchdowns against just 15 interceptions.

No. 111 overall: Terrence McGee, CB, Northwestern State (2003)

Drafted team: Bills

McGee played 10 NFL seasons and was recognized with one Pro Bowl selection, which came in his first year as a starter in Buffalo during his second pro season. He accumulated 17 interceptions while playing in 122 games with the Bills.

No. 112 overall: Fred Marion, S, Miami (1982)

Drafted team: Patriots

Marion who played 10 NFL seasons with New England, made the Pro Bowl during the Patriots’ excellent 1985 season thanks to his seven interceptions and three fumble recoveries. Marion, who had 29 career picks, also racked up three more interceptions in the playoffs as the Patriots stormed to the Super Bowl before ultimately losing to one of the greatest teams of all-time in the 1985 Bears.

No. 113 overall: Kevin Greene, LB, Auburn (1985)

Drafted team: Rams

Greene, who has been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, made five Pro Bowl appearances and is a two-time first-team All-Pro selection. The star pass-rusher recorded 160 career sacks over the course of 15 NFL seasons, leading the league twice in the category.

No. 114 overall: Herschel Walker, RB, Georgia (1985)

Drafted team: Cowboys

Walker lasting to this point of the draft is the upset of the century, regardless of his situation. One of the SEC’s most successful rushers went on to rush for 8,225 yards and add 4,859 receiving yards. Walker, who had two Pro Bowl berths in his first three seasons with the Cowboys, is perhaps most known for the stunning trade that sent him to Minnesota for a boatload of picks, which helped Dallas lay the groundwork for their title teams.

No. 115 overall: Larry Centers, FB, S.F. Austin (1990)

Drafted team: Cardinals

I am an equal opportunity writer, and the fullback position deserved to be recognized. Centers was clearing paths and doing the dirty work for others but he still managed to accumulate 2,188 rushing yards and 6,797 receiving yards. Three Pro Bowl selections and first-team All-Pro recognition validated a successful career.

No. 116 overall: Steve Grogan, QB, Kansas State (1975)

Drafted team: Patriots

While Grogan never earned any Pro Bowl or All-Pro accolades, the longtime Patriots quarterback threw for almost 27,000 yards over the course of his career while making 149 appearances (135 starts). He did help lead the Patriots to five straight winning seasons after the team had managed five winning seasons in its first 15 years combined.

No. 117 overall: Steve Largent, WR, Tulsa (1976)

Drafted team: Oilers

The Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee made seven Pro Bowl appearances in his career. He caught over 13,000 yards worth of passes in addition to an even 100 receiving touchdowns, all coming with the Seahawks after a preseason trade during his rookie year.

No. 118 overall: Mark Brunell, QB, Washington (1993)

Drafted team: Packers

A gun-slinging lefty, Brunell appeared in three Pro Bowls after throwing for 32,000 yards. Brunell, who started 151 games in 18 seasons, led the league in passing in his third professional season but may have done his best work in 1999, when the Jaguars went 14-2 and mauled the Dolphins 62-7 in the playoffs before getting upended by a Titans team that was also responsible for Jacksonville’s two regular-season losses.

No. 119 overall: Brandon Marshall, WR, UCF (2006)

Drafted team: Broncos

Marshall was viewed as a bit of a headache before diagnosing and addressing some issues in his own personal life. Few would argue the amount of talent that he brought to the gridiron though. He has over 12,000 career receiving yards, which led to six Pro Bowl appearances and a first-team All-Pro selection, and he topped 1,000 yards eight times with four different teams.

No. 120 overall: Geno Atkins, DT, Georgia (2010)

Drafted team: Bengals

Atkins has spent his entire career with the Bengals. He has suffered some injuries along the way but has still managed 75.5 sacks to day. He has made eight Pro Bowl appearances and was named a first-team All-Pro twice. He has done a lot to teach the young players in the league and has earned the respect of many. 

No. 121 overall: Michael Carter, NT, Southern Methodist (1984)

Drafted team: 49ers

Carter was a gap-filler throughout his career. He only recorded 22.5 sacks in his career but fulfilled his primary task, as the defensive tackle made three Pro Bowl appearances and was a first-team All-Pro selection. 

No. 122 overall: Hardy Nickerson, LB, California (1987)

Drafted team: Steelers

Nickerson was really fun to watch during his career. He started 200 games in the NFL over 16 seasons. The linebacker made five Pro Bowl appearances and was twice named a first-team All-Pro, and his best season may have been in 1993 when he tallied a ridiculous 214 tackles for the Buccaneers.

No. 123 overall: Domata Peko, DT, Michigan State (2006)

Drafted team: Bengals

Peko has never been a flashy player but he has been consistent throughout his career. He has started nearly 200 games in his 14 NFL seasons, with most coming with the Bengals.

No. 124 overall: Ben Coates, TE, Livingstone (1991)

Drafted team: Patriots

Coates, who recorded 499 receptions for 5,555 yards and 50 touchdowns in his career, was selected to five Pro Bowls and was recognized as a first-team All-Pro twice while emerging as one of the best tight ends in the game in the mid-1990s.

No. 125 overall: Mike Webster, C, Wisconsin (1974)

Drafted team: Steelers

The Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee started 217 games at center during his career while earning nine Pro Bowl appearances and getting named a first-team All-Pro five times. Webster became a full-time starter for the Steelers after their second Super Bowl championship and helped the team win two more titles before the end of the decade.

No. 126 overall: Jared Allen, EDGE, Idaho State (2004)

Drafted team: Chiefs

Allen, who was a really entertaining player on and off the field, recorded 136 sacks before calling it quits. His career ended with five Pro Bowl appearances and four first-team All-Pro honors, but his peak likely came in 2011 when he lead the league with 22 sacks.

No. 127 overall: Ray Edwards, DE, Purdue (2006)

Drafted team: Vikings

Edwards, who was another successful pass rusher for the Vikings in the 2000s, recorded 33 career sacks in his career. After moving on to Atlanta on a big-money deal, Edwards didn’t make much of an impact with his new team in 2011 and saw his career come to an end one year later.

No. 128 overall: Larry Foote, LB, Michigan (2002)

Drafted team: Steelers

Foote, who started 134 games during his career, was a consistent performer over the course of his 13 NFL seasons while manning the middle for several great Steelers defenses. He was a key part of Pittsburgh’s Super Bowl title teams in both 2005 and 2008.

No. 129 overall: Rob Burnett, DE, Syracuse (1990)

Drafted team: Browns

Burnett, who recorded 73 career sacks, went to one Pro Bowl over 14 seasons. He racked up double-digit sacks twice for the Browns/Ravens, including in 2000 as part of Baltimore’s Super Bowl-winning team.

No. 130 overall: Darren Sproles, RB, Kansas State (2005)

Drafted team: Chargers

Sproles, who was diminutive but explosive through the peak of his career, proved lethal as a running back, pass catcher and returner. Over the course of his career, he had nearly 20,000 all-purpose yards, with a majority coming in the return game. Sproles’ three Pro Bowl bids all came after he landed in Philadelphia in his 30s.

No. 131 overall: Blake Martinez, LB, Stanford (2016)

Drafted team: Packers

The No. 131 overall selection has little competition at No. 131, so I am gambling on Martinez ultimately ending his career as the best ever for this slot. He’s posted 140-plus tackles in each of his last three seasons, leading the league in the statistic in 2017.

No. 132 overall: Mike Daniels, DT, Iowa (2012)

Drafted team: Packers

Like the last Packers draft pick, Daniels benefits from uninspiring competition at this slot. The defensive lineman has played for seven seasons and made one Pro Bowl appearance.

No. 133 overall: Kam Chancellor, S, Virginia Tech (2010)

Drafted team: Seahawks

Chancellor was forced to retire earlier than expected but his impact on the game was substantial. He made four Pro Bowl appearances in eight seasons. The former Hokie was an enforcer and staple member of the “Legion of Boom” but also came up with key interceptions, including two in the playoffs during Seattle’s Super Bowl-winning run and a 90-yard pick-six in the playoffs the following year.

No. 134 overall: Kyle Williams, DT, LSU (2006)

Drafted team: Bills

Williams was an athletic interior defender that always gave maximum effort, and Bills fans will tell you he’s one of the more underrated players of this century. He made six Pro Bowl appearances in 13 seasons, all coming in Buffalo, and while he wasn’t known for racking up sacks as a penetrating pocket attacker, Williams did have one double-digit sack season in his career.

No. 135 overall: Dak Prescott, QB, Mississippi State (2016)

Drafted team: Cowboys

The script is still being written for Prescott. Most believe that he will stay with the Cowboys, but either way, he has already exceeded expectations from this draft slot. Offensive guard Josh Sitton and wide receiver Joe Horn were intriguing candidates here as well, but it’s impossible to go against the 2016 Offensive Rookie of the Year who has already been to two Pro Bowls while going 40-24 as a starter.

No. 136 overall: Billy Shields, OT, Georgia Tech (1975)

Drafted team: Chargers

Shields started 119 games in his 11-year career but did not make a Pro Bowl appearance. A longtime starter at left tackle for the Chargers, Shields did win a Super Bowl in his first year after leaving San Diego as a reserve with the 49ers.

No. 137 overall: Grady Jarrett, DT, Clemson (2015)

Drafted team: Falcons

Jarrett is a dream for an NFL general manager, as the Falcons invested a fifth round pick and got a Pro Bowl caliber player in return, with his first trip to the all-star game coming last year. Jarrett has managed 21.5 sacks in 77 games (62 starts) thus far.

No. 138 overall: Robert Mathis, EDGE, Alabama A&M (2003)

Drafted team: Colts

Mathis, who had such a professional approach to the game, recorded 123 sacks over the course of the career, which resulted in five Pro Bowl appearances and a first-team All-Pro selection late in his career, when he led the league with 19.5 sacks in 2013. Mathis also forced 54 fumbles in his career, leading the league three times, and he had three more forced fumbles during the playoffs of Indy’s Super Bowl-winning season in 2006.

No. 139 overall: Benji Olson, OG, Washington (1998)

Drafted team: Titans 

Olson didn’t play much as a rookie but wound up locked in as a starter for Tennessee for nine seasons, beginning with the 1999 team that came up a yard short to the Rams in the Super Bowl. The Titans went to the playoff five times during Olson’s tenure as a starter.

No. 140 overall: Terance Mathis, WR, New Mexico (1990)

Drafted team: Jets

Mathis, who had 8,809 receiving yards and 63 touchdowns in his career, made one Pro Bowl appearance in 1994, his first season as a featured starter after coming to the Falcons following four years as a reserve with the Jets.

No. 141 overall: Doug Evans, CB, Louisiana Tech (1993)

Drafted team: Packers

Evans, who started 120 games over the course of 11 seasons, recorded 28 career interceptions in his career. His breakout came in 1996 as he recorded five picks in the regular season and another in the playoffs for a Packers team that went on to win the Super Bowl. Evans landed in Carolina in the second half of his career, which featured an eight-interception season as well.

No. 142 overall: Doug Dieken, OT, Illinois (1971)

Drafted team: Browns

Dieken, who made one Pro Bowl appearance, started 194 games over the course of 14 seasons while being locked in as Cleveland’s left tackle.

No. 143 overall: Josh Norman, CB, Coastal Carolina (2012)

Drafted team: Panthers

A popular phrase to be uttered at this point of the project: the number of qualified candidates for each selection are few and far between. Norman has at times been considered one of the best corners in the game, and he had two pick-sixes and four interceptions in all as a first-team All-Pro in 2015, his final season in Carolina.

No. 144 overall: Joe Klecko, DT, Temple (1977)

Drafted team: Jets

Klecko, who appeared in four Pro Bowls and was a two-time first-team All-Pro, was part of the Jets’ heralded “New York Sack Exchange” defense. Sacks weren’t counted as an official statistic until 1982, so Klecko’s monster 1981 season goes unnoticed in the record books, but he made a big difference in turning the Jets back into a contender in that decade.

No. 145 overall: Rodney Harrison, DB, Western Illinois (1994)

Drafted team: Chargers

Fans probably associate Harrison with the Patriots because of the role he played during key Super Bowl victories, but he was already established as one of the best safeties in the league before he ever suited up for Bill Belichick. Harrison was a two-time first-team All-Pro and two-time Pro Bowl participant, though none of those accolades came in what might have been his best season, when he racked up six sacks and six picks in 2000. He had 34 interceptions and 30.5 sacks throughout his career.

No. 146 overall: Trent Cole, EDGE, Cincinnati (2005)

Drafted team: Eagles

In a lot of instances, I have had to scrap the bottom of the barrel to find a good selection at this stage of the draft, but that’s not the case with No. 146 overall. My candidates included Stefon Diggs, Matt Judon and George Kittle. Cole gets the edge at this point thanks to his 90.5 career sacks while spending most of his time as a member of some great Eagles defenses.

No. 147 overall: Mel Gray, WR, Missouri (1971)

Drafted team: Rams

Gray, who made four Pro Bowls, amassed 6,644 receiving yards and 45 receiving touchdowns during his career. He earned first-team All-Pro distinction for a 1975 season in which he led the league with 11 touchdowns while also posting career-bests in catches (48) and receiving yards (926).

No. 148 overall: Ray Brown, S, West Texas A&M (1971)

Drafted team: Falcons

Brown never earned Pro Bowl recognition but proved to be a ballhawk during his 130 games played, recording 38 interceptions. Part of that may be attributed to the team around him; though Brown recorded eight interceptions in 1974 (including one pick-six), the Falcons limped to a 3-11 record that year.

No. 149 overall: Dorsey Levens, RB, Georgia Tech (1994)

Drafted team: Packers

Levens, who made one Pro Bowl appearance playing alongside Brett Favre, totaled 4,955 rushing yards, 2,334 receiving yards and 53 total touchdowns in his career. He started more than five games just three times in his career but helped make an impact for Green Bay’s title team in 1996, recording 351 yards on 49 touches in three playoff games.

No. 150 overall: Greg Lloyd, LB, Fort Valley State (1987)

Drafted team: Steelers

Lloyd was well-decorated by the time his career came to an end, with five Pro Bowl bids and three first-team All-Pro designations. The edge rusher is credited with 54.5 sacks, 35 forced fumbles and 11 interceptions during his career.

No. 151 overall: Avery Williamson, LB, Kentucky (2014)

Drafted team: Titans

Williamson will have to battle back from a torn ACL suffered last season to build upon what’s already been a promising career in his first five seasons, fourth in Tennessee. The linebacker set a career-high with 120 tackles in his first year with the Jets.

No. 152 overall: Eugene Lockhart, LB, Houston (1984)

Drafted team: Cowboys

Redskins interior defender Matthew Ioannidis could eventually come for this spot, but Lockhart played nine seasons and started 117 games, mostly with the Cowboys prior to their 1990s dynasty.

No. 153 overall: Dante Hall, WR/KR, Texas A&M (2000)

Drafted team: Chiefs

Hall was average as a wide receiver but his greatest impact was made on special teams, as was elusive as a return man. Hall, who was a two-time Pro Bowl selection and a first-team All-Pro, managed 14,386 all-purpose yards in his career.

No. 154 overall: Zach Thomas, LB, Texas Tech (1996)

Drafted team: Dolphins

Thomas was a seven-time Pro Bowl selection and a five-time first-team All-Pro. He was a bit undersized but perfect in Miami’s scheme, and he totaled 154 tackles as a rookie before adding five more 150-tackle seasons in his career. Cornerback Richard Sherman is also a strong candidate for this spot.

No. 155 overall: Michael Sinclair, DE, Eastern New Mexico (1991)

Drafted team: Seahawks

Sinclair,who had 73.5 career sacks, emerged as a force in his late 20s. He made three straight Pro Bowl appearances from 1996-98, totaling 41.5 sacks and 15 forced fumbles during that stretch.

No. 156 overall: Ed Newman, OG, Duke (1973)

Drafted team: Dolphins

Newman made four Pro Bowl appearances in the last four years of his career and was a first-team All-Pro in his final season in 1984. While he was a reserve during the first half of his career, Newman emerged as a key member of a Dolphins team that went to two Super Bowls in the early 1980s.

No. 157 overall: Keith Bishop, OG, Baylor (1980)

Drafted team: Broncos

Bishop, who made two Pro Bowl appearances during his 10-year career, emerged as a starter for a Broncos team that returned to the playoffs in 1983 for the first time in four years during John Elway’s rookie season. He was also a starter for the team’s three Super Bowl bids during a four-year stretch in the 1980s.

No. 158 overall: Jay Novacek, TE, Wyoming (1985)

Drafted team: Rams

Novacek has five Pro Bowl appearances, all coming in his final five seasons, as well as a first-team All-Pro selection in 1992. He tallied 4,630 receiving yards and 30 touchdowns while emerging as a reliable weapon on three championship teams.

No. 159 overall: Jake Scott, S, Georgia (1970)

Drafted team: Dolphins

Scott made five Pro Bowl appearances in addition to being named first-team All-Pro twice. He was an immediate starter for the Dolphins despite being a seventh-round selection, and he racked up five of his 49 career interceptions as a rookie. Scott won two titles with the Dolphins before finishing his career in Washington.

No. 160 overall: David Diehl, OL, Illinois (2003)

Drafted team: Giants

Diehl played for 11 seasons and started 160 games, including all 16 as a rookie for the 2003 Giants. He made the Pro Bowl in 2009 and was a key part of the offensive line for two Super Bowl-winning teams. 

No. 161 overall: Harold Carmichael, WR, Southern (1971)

Drafted team: Eagles

Carmichael was eventually elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2020 36 years after the end of his career. He made four Pro Bowl appearances, the first of which coming in his breakout season in 1973 when he led the league with 67 receptions and 1,116 receiving yards. The longtime Eagle finished his career with 8,985 receiving yards and 79 touchdowns.

No. 162 overall: Don Griffin, CB, Middle Tennessee State (1986)

Drafted team: 49ers

Griffin, who played for 11 NFL seasons while starting 139 games, won two Super Bowls with the 49ers in the late 1980s. He finished his career with 25 interceptions and also recorded a sack in his team’s beatdown of the Broncos in Super Bowl XXIV.

No. 163 overall: Lemar Parrish, CB, Lincoln (1970)

Drafted team: Bengals

Parrish, who had 47 interceptions over the course of his career, made eight Pro Bowl appearances, including in both of his first two seasons. He was also a first-team All-Pro for Washington in 1979 thanks to a nine-interception season.

No. 164 overall: Carl Nicks, OG, Nebraska (2008)

Drafted team: Saints

Nicks only played six seasons but was effective in such a short time. He won a Super Bowl with the Saints in his second season, then made two Pro Bowl appearances the following two years and was named a first-team All-Pro in 2011. 

No. 165 overall: Tyreek Hill, WR, West Alabama (2016)

Drafted team: Chiefs

Hill remains a fear-inspiring burner for Kansas City. His speed has speed to burn. While off-field issues were the reason for his slide, Hill has managed to earn a lucrative long-term deal. The wide receiver has already compiled 281 receptions for 4,115 yards and 32 touchdowns. Not bad for a fifth-round pick. 

No. 166 overall: La’Roi Glover, DT, San Diego State (1996)

Drafted team: Raiders

Glover, who finished with 83.5 sacks from his interior defensive tackle spot, amassed six Pro Bowl appearances and was named a first-team All-Pro in 2000 when he led the league with 17 sacks.

No. 167 overall: Reggie Roby, P, Iowa (1983)

Drafted team: Dolphins

There was not an obvious player to fill this spot at No. 167, so showing some love to special teams was the way to go. Roby was a three-time Pro Bowl selection and was named a first team All-Pro twice. 

No. 168 overall: Max Montoya, OG, UCLA (1979)

Drafted team: Bengals

Montoya, who started nearly 200 games in his career, was named to the Pro Bowl four times. He helped the Bengals reach the Super Bowl in his second season as a starter in 1981, and Cincinnati ranked in the top five in offensive yards in eight of his nine seasons on the line.

No. 169 overall: Al Harris, CB, Texas A&M-Kingsville (1997)

Drafted team: Buccaneers

Harris, who made two Pro Bowl appearances and started 128 games over the course of 14 seasons, didn’t really emerge as a force until he landed with the Packers in 1989 following five years as a reserve in Philadelphia. His most memorable moment came in January 2004 when his 52-yard pick-six delivered the Packers an overtime win over the Seahawks in the wild-card round.

No. 170 overall: Michael McCrary, DE, Wake Forest (1993)

Drafted team: Seahawks

McCrary made two Pro Bowls while starting 88 games in his 10-year career. He topped double-digit sacks three times, finishing with 71 sacks by the time he retired as well as one Super Bowl championship with the 2000 Ravens, for whom he had six sacks in four playoff games.

No. 171 overall: Gary Anderson, K, Syracuse (1982)

Drafted team: Bills

Anderson was named to four Pro Bowls over the course of his 23-year career and earned first-team All-Pro honors for going a perfect 94 for 94 on kicks during the regular season in 1998 (don’t ask Vikings fans about what he did that postseason). Greg Zuerlein could potentially challenge Anderson’s stance down the road for the best No. 171 pick of the post-merger era.

No. 172 overall: Brandon Fusco, G, Slippery Rock (2011)

Drafted team: Vikings

There weren’t many options to pick from at No. 172, but we’re going with Fusco due to his 87 starts from 2012-18. Packers guard Derrel Gofourth is another option but the Green Bay teams he played on in the late ’70s and early ’80s weren’t much to write home about either. 

No. 173 overall: Matt Birk, C, Harvard (1998)

Drafted team: Vikings

A few Vikings offensive linemen back to back. Birk made six Pro Bowl appearances, including in each of his first two years as a starter, while starting 187 games during his career. Birk finally won a Super Bowl with the Ravens in his final season in 2012.

No. 174 overall: Freddie Scott, WR, Amherst (1974)

Drafted team: Colts

There are some players from really small schools taking advantage of their opportunities, and this Amherst product is one of them. Scott played appeared in 132 games over 10 seasons, making 81 starts. He posted his first 1,000-yard season with the Lions in 1981 at the age of 29 but caught just 18 passes in two seasons after that.

No. 175 overall: Charlie Johnson, NT, Colorado (1977)

Drafted team: Eagles

Johnson managed three Pro Bowl appearances and was named a first-team All-Pro twice during his peak from 1979-81, which also include a three-interception position despite his spot on the defensive line. He helped turn the Eagles into the best defense in the league during that span and played a key role in helping the team reach the Super Bowl during the 1980 season.

No. 176 overall: Harry Hamilton, S, Penn State (1984)

Drafted team: Jets

Hamilton, who started in 84 of his 98 appearances, didn’t reach his peak until leaving the Jets for the Buccaneers, where he recorded 17 of his 23 career interceptions in a three-year span. 

No. 177 overall: Dhani Jones, LB, Michigan (2000)

Drafted team: Giants

Jones, who started 131 games during his career, made an impact for three different teams, spending three years each with the Giants and Eagles before perhaps his best run in Cincinnati, where he had three of his four 100-tackle seasons.

No. 178 overall: Perry Williams, CB, N.C. State (1983)

Drafted team: Giants

Williams, who started 122 of his 146 career appearances, won a pair of Super Bowls with the Giants, including in 1986 when he had a career-high four interceptions. Quarterback Gardner Minshew could wind up surpassing Williams if he is able to retain his starting job for several years. 

No. 179 overall: Steve Jordan, TE, Brown (1982)

Drafted team: Vikings

Jordan emerged as one of the best tight ends of the 1980s, leading to six consecutive Pro Bowl appearances from 1986-91. The 149-game starter caught 498 passes for 6,307 yards and 28 touchdowns during his 13-year career, all with the Vikings.

No. 180 overall: Tyrod Taylor, QB, Virginia Tech (2011)

Drafted team: Ravens

Taylor, who held a starting job in Buffalo briefly, is expected to start for the Chargers to begin 2020. He threw just 16 interceptions while making 43 starts for the Bills in a three-year span, which included a Pro Bowl bid in 2015.

No. 181 overall: Greg Biekert, LB, Colorado (1993)

Drafted team: Raiders

Biekert proved to be a tackle machine during his 11-year career, racking up 1,096 tackles while starting 155 of his 176 games played.

No. 182 overall: Jim Osborne, DT, Southern (1972)

Drafted team: Bears

Southern has been really well-represented on this list with five players, and Osborne shined as a long-time starter in Chicago, where he started 154 of his 186 games played. Unfortunately, his career ended one year before the famed 1985 Bears won the Super Bowl.

No. 183 overall: Cody Risien, OT, Texas A&M (1979)

Drafted team: Browns

Risien, who made two Pro Bowl appearances in 11 seasons, started 140 games with the Browns, primarily playing right tackle. While he lost one year to injury, Risien helped the Browns make the playoffs in seven of his 10 other seasons.

No. 184 overall: Daimon Shelton, FB, Sacramento State (1997)

Drafted team: Jaguars

The choices at No. 184 are pretty sparse, but Shelton deserves a shoutout for playing a role on some great Jaguars offenses in the late 1990s. His first extended action came as a second-year player for the division-winning Jags, then he played a role for the team that went 14-2 the following year but lost to the Titans in the playoffs.

No. 185 overall: Jeff Zgonina, DT, Purdue (1993)

Drafted team: Steelers

Only two players picked No. 185 overall have played more than 100 games, and Zgonina has 107 more appearances than the next closest eligible player, having played 17 seasons for six different teams. The former Boilermaker won a Super Bowl title with the Rams in 1999.

No. 186 overall: Adalius Thomas, LB, Southern Mississippi (2000)

Drafted team: Ravens

Southern Mississippi churns out some talented linebackers. Thomas made two Pro Bowl appearances and was a first-team All-Pro in 2006, when he recorded 11 sacks and returned a fumble 57 yards for a touchdown. The 109-game starter finished with 53 career sacks.

No. 187 overall: Matt Hasselbeck, QB, Boston College (1998)

Drafted team: Packers

Hasselbeck would be considered the ultimate sixth-round success story at quarterback were it not for the guy coming up in 12 picks. The quarterback, who appeared in three Pro Bowls with the Seahawks in the mid-2000s, threw for nearly 37,000 yards and 212 touchdowns over the course of 17 seasons.

No. 188 overall: Danny Trevathan, LB, Kentucky (2012)  

Drafted team: Broncos

Trevathan took advantage of his opportunity with Denver, where he won a Super Bowl in his final season with the Broncos, and parlayed that into a lucrative long-term deal with the Bears. He has topped 100 tackles three times in eight seasons.

No. 189 overall: Tom Banks, C, Auburn (1970)

Drafted team: Rams

Banks appeared in four straight Pro Bowls in the late ’70s and was a first-team All-Pro selection in 1976. The 100-game starter played a key role for a Rams team that went to the playoffs eight straight times during that era.

No. 190 overall: Ahtyba Rubin, DT, Iowa State (2008)

Drafted team: Browns

Rubin is a space eater who played a dependable role during his 10-year career. He started in 107 of his 143 games played, managing to total 15 sacks despite not being asked to play the role of someone getting after the quarterback.

No. 191 overall: Jason Kelce, C, Cincinnati (2011)

Drafted team: Eagles

Kelce, who remains one of the best centers in football even as his career is possibly nearing the end, has made three Pro Bowl appearances and was named a first-team All-Pro three times. Kelce, who has made 126 career starts, would also have a Super Bowl Parade MVP trophy if it existed.

No. 192 overall: Shannon Sharpe, TE, Savannah State (1990)

Drafted team: Broncos

Sharpe, who was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2011, is one of the best tight ends to ever play the game. He made eight Pro Bowl appearances and was a first-team All-Pro four times. He caught 815 passes for 10,060 yards and 62 touchdowns in his career, which also included three Super Bowl titles.

No. 193 overall: Grady Jackson, DT, Knoxville (1997)

Drafted team: Raiders

Jackson enjoyed a long career with six different teams, playing 13 seasons while starting 129 games. He recorded 19 of his 35.5 career sacks in his first five seasons with the Raiders before becoming a journeyman contributor who also started 20-plus games with the Falcons, Packers and Saints.

No. 194 overall: Leonard Thompson, WR, Oklahoma State (1975)

Drafted team: Lions

Thompson emerged as a starter later in his career but still hung on to play 175 games, a great accomplishment for an eighth-round pick in 1975. He had 277 receptions for 4,682 yards and 35 touchdowns, all coming with the Lions, and though he never averaged more than 60 yards per game in any season, he did explode for 150 yards on seven catches in a playoff loss for the 1982 Lions.

No. 195 overall: Antonio Brown, WR, Central Michigan (2010)

Drafted team: Steelers

Brown was arguably the best receiver in football for a number of years, but off-field issues have quickly dropped him off the NFL radar. He remains unsigned despite likely having plenty to contribute on the field. Brown has appeared in seven Pro Bowls and was named first-team All-Pro four times. As of now, he has 841 receptions for 11,263 yards and 75 touchdowns.

No. 196 overall: Terrell Davis, RB, Georgia (1995)

Drafted team: Broncos

Davis, who was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2017, was a benefactor of Alex Gibbs’ wide-zone blocking scheme. Davis had great vision and speed to take advantage of the gaps that developed. He appeared in three Pro Bowls, was named a first-team All-Pro three times, played a key role in two Super Bowl titles and earned MVP distinction in 1998 for his 2,008 rushing yards at the age of 26. Despite his status as one of the game’s best players, Davis only appeared in 16 more games in three seasons following his MVP year.

No. 197 overall: Gus Frerotte, QB, Tulsa (1994)

Drafted team: Redskins

Frerotte was named to the Pro Bowl in his third season but he largely filled a journeyman backup role in the NFL during his 15-year career.

No. 198 overall: Troy Brown, WR, Marshall (1993)

Drafted team: Patriots

Marshall has now had a few wide receivers on this list. Brown, who made one Pro Bowl appearance in 2001, played a big role during the playoffs in two of his three Super Bowl-winning seasons. He caught 557 passes for 6,366 yards and 31 touchdowns during the regular season but also contributed in the return game and even on defense at times. 

No. 199 overall: Tom Brady, QB, Michigan (2000)

Drafted team: Patriots

Brady has amassed 1,037 yards on 606 career rushing attempts, which puts him just ahead of Theo Riddick for second all-time among 199th-overall picks behind the other Adrian Peterson (1,283 yards). We’ll give him a bump for the rest of his resume and make him our pick here.

No. 200 overall: Chris Myers, C, Miami (2005)

Drafted team: Broncos

Myers served as a 16-game starter for eight straight seasons, seven with the Texans. He appeared in back-to-back Pro Bowls in 2011 and 2012, Houston’s first two division titles.

No. 201 overall: Jamal Anderson, RB, Utah (1994)

Drafted team: Falcons

Anderson earned Pro Bowl and first-team All-Pro honors for a 1998 season in which he led the league with 410 rushing attempts, amassing 1,846 yards and 14 touchdowns in his age-26 season. He recorded 5,336 rushing yards, 1,645 receiving yards and 41 total touchdowns but played just one full season after that All-Pro year.

No. 202 overall: Earnest Jackson, RB, Texas A&M (1983)

Drafted team: Chargers

It is a bare group at No. 202 overall, with Jackson as the only player drafted in this spot to make a Pro Bowl, which he did in 1984 and 1986. He played in 81 games for three different teams while topping 1,000 rushing yards twice.

No. 203 overall: Richard Dent, DE, Tennessee State(1983)

Drafted team: Bears

Dent was a four-time Pro Bowl selection and was named a first-team All-Pro as part of the dominant 1985 Bears defense. He totaled 34.5 sacks over a two-year stretch early in his career before going on to finish with 137.5 career sacks in 203 games played, which earned the two-time Super Bowl champion a spot in the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2011. 

No. 204 overall: Rich Saul, C, Michigan State (1970)

Drafted team: Rams

Saul saw minimal action in his first five seasons with the Rams but made six consecutive Pro Bowl appearances from 1976-1981 before retiring. Saul helped the team make the playoffs in all but his final year as a starter.

No. 205 overall: Pierre Garcon, WR, Mount Union (2008)

Drafted team: Colts

Garcon may have been a sixth-round pick, but that didn’t stop him from emerging as a regular starter for the Colts in only his second season. He went on to play in 148 games in his career (131 starts) while hauling in 628 receptions for 7,854 yards and 38 touchdowns, which included a league-high 113 catches in 2013 with Washington.

No. 206 overall: Kevin Gogan, OG, Washington (1987)

Drafted team: Cowboys

Gogan won two Super Bowls in his seven seasons in Dallas before making three Pro Bowl appearances with the Raiders and 49ers in his 30s. The 179-game starter made five playoff trips as a starter in his career.

No. 207 overall: Jessie Armstead, LB, Miami (1993)

Drafted team: Giants

Armstead played at a high level for 11 seasons, as he made five Pro Bowl appearances and was honored as a first-team All-Pro in 1997 for his career-best 132 tackles. Over the course of his career, he started 129 games, recording 12 interceptions and 40 sacks. 

No. 208 overall: Seth Joyner, LB, UTEP (1986)

Drafted team: Eagles

Joyner appeared in the Pro Bowl three times while starting in 172 of his 195 games played. He posted at least 110 tackles for six straight years in Philadelphia. His career ended with 24 interceptions and 52 sacks, and he was able to win his first Super Bowl as a reserve with the Broncos in his final season.

No. 209 overall: Chad Cota, S, Oregon (1995)

Drafted team: Panthers

There aren’t a lot of great options for No. 209, but Cota managed to carve out an eight-year career, including 82 starts in 125 games. He managed five interceptions as a reserve in his second season before adding a 49-yard interception return in the playoffs, and that led to a five-year stretch as a starter for three different teams.

No. 210 overall: Stan Walters, OT, Syracuse (1972)

Drafted team: Bengals

Walters spent three years in Cincinnati but made his mark in Philadelphia, where he earned two Pro Bowl bids with the Eagles for a pair of playoff teams in 1978 and 1979. He remained the team’s left tackle for their Super Bowl run the following season as well and started 148 games in all.

No. 211 overall: David Tyree, WR, Syracuse (2003)

Drafted team: Giants

Tyree was essentially a special teams player during his career, amassing just 54 receptions in the regular season, but that doesn’t tell the whole story. Without Tyree, we wouldn’t have The Helmet Catch, which helped knock off the 18-0 Patriots in Super Bowl XLII.

No. 212 overall: Harry Galbreath, OG, Tennessee (1988)

Drafted team: Dolphins

Galbreath started 131 games, mostly with the Dolphins and Packers. He made it to the playoffs in five of his eight seasons with those two teams and advanced past the first round in each of those playoff berths, though the Bills and Cowboys kept him from reaching the Super Bowl in any of those seasons.

No. 213 overall: Donald Driver, WR, Alcorn State (1999)

Drafted team: Packers

Driver, who made three Pro Bowls with the Packers, was outstanding from 1999 to 2012. During that time, racked up 10,137 receiving yards as well as 61 receiving touchdowns while starting 155 games. His career includes seven 1,000-yard seasons and a Super Bowl title in his age-35 season.

No. 214 overall: Blaine Bishop, S, Ball State (1993)

Drafted team: Oilers

Bishop, who made four Pro Bowl appearances for the Oilers/Titans, started 120 games over the course of his career. He only managed five interceptions but did have two 100-tackle seasons in his first few years in Houston.

No. 215 overall: Cortland Finnegan, CB, Samford (2006)

Drafted team: Titans

Finnegan earned Pro Bowl and first-team All-Pro honors in 2008 when he had five interceptions and a career-best 17 passes defended. He started 111 games over the course of his career and developed a reputation as one of the scrappiest players in the league.

No. 216 overall: Captain Munnerlyn, CB, South Carolina (2009)

Drafted team: Panthers

Munnerlyn has played in 154 games (85 starts) since being taken in the seventh round in 2009. He’s returned five of his 12 career interceptions for touchdowns.

No. 217 overall: Lyle Blackwood, S, TCU (1973)

Drafted team: Broncos

Blackwood made stops in Cincinnati and Seattle before exploding as a member of the Colts in 1977, recording a league-high 10 interceptions in his first full year as a starter. He ended up totaling 35 interceptions in 176 games played while making 105 starts in his career.

No. 218 overall: Tom Nalen, C, Boston College (1994)

Drafted team: Broncos

Nalen, who was twice named a first-team All-Pro and made five Pro Bowl appearances, earned two Super Bowl titles with Denver in the 1990s. He started 188 games with the Broncos while remaining a fixture on the interior of the offensive line.

No. 219 overall: Mark Bortz, OG, Iowa (1983)

Drafted team: Bears

Bortz, who earned a Super Bowl title with the Bears in 1985, made two Pro Bowl appearances in 1988 and 1990. He played in 171 games in his career, making 155 starts.

No. 220 overall: Shamar Stephen, DT, Connecticut (2014)

Drafted team: Vikings

A few players taken at No. 220 managed to carve out solid careers largely as reserves, but Stephen has done enough in his six seasons that we’re giving him the nod. He only has four sacks while largely defending the run for Minnesota and Seattle, but he has managed 49 career starts, mostly coming in three of the last four years.

No. 221 overall: Billy Ard, OG, Wake Forest (1981)

Drafted team: Giants

Ard was entrenched on the interior of New York’s line when the team won the Super Bowl in 1986, and he went on to finish his career with 123 starts in 148 games played, though he missed the Giants’ 1990 Super Bowl win after heading to Green Bay in 1989.

No. 222 overall: Trent Green, QB, Indiana (1993)

Drafted team: Chargers

Green missed the 1999 season with a knee injury, allowing Kurt Warner to emerge as the leader of The Greatest Show on Turf. But Green rallied back to have a pair of Pro Bowl seasons with the Chiefs. He threw for over 28,000 yards and 162 touchdowns in his career and is now a member of the NFL on CBS broadcasts on Sundays.

No. 223 overall: Mark Clayton, WR, Louisville (1983)

Drafted team: Dolphins

A five-time Pro Bowl player, Clayton led the league in receiving touchdowns twice, including when he caught 73 passes for 1,389 yards and 18 touchdowns in his breakout sophomore season. He recorded 582 receptions for 8,974 yards and 84 touchdowns. 

No. 224 overall: Jay Ratliff, DT, Auburn (2005)

Drafted team: Cowboys

Ratliff, who started 102 games and recorded 35 sacks in his career, made four straight Pro Bowls for the Cowboys from 2008-11, including a first-team All-Pro distinction in 2009.

No. 225 overall: Reuben Davis, DL, North Carolina (1988)

Drafted team: Seahawks

J.R. Sweezy deserves consideration here, but Davis was able to enjoy a long career as defensive lineman with three different teams, including starting 122 of his 139 games played. Despite his low draft stock, he stepped in as an immediate starter for the 1988 Bucs and played a key role in the 1994 Chargers making the Super Bowl, as his third-quarter safety in the wild-card round started a rally that turned a 21-6 halftime deficit into a 22-21 win.

No. 226 overall: Steve Tasker, WR, Northwestern (1985)

Drafted team: Oilers

Tasker was primarily a special teams gunner, but he was the best at it for a long stretch of time. Tasker was named to seven Pro Bowls over the course of his 13 NFL seasons while becoming a beloved figure on several great Bills teams.

No. 227 overall: Brad Johnson, QB, Florida State (1992)

Drafted team: Vikings

Johnson was a ninth-round pick in 1992 but did enough with his opportunities in Minnesota to carve out an outstanding career in his 30s that included two Pro Bowl bids and one Super Bowl title. Johnson threw for 29,054 yards and 166 touchdowns in his career while starting 125 games.

No. 228 overall: Kris Brown, K, Nebraska (1999)

Drafted team: Steelers

Brown excelled in his first two seasons in Pittsburgh, but a rocky third year left him to latch on with Houston, where he enjoyed most of his success. Brown kicked for 12 seasons and appeared in 179 games.

No. 229 overall: Jason Ferguson, DT, Georgia (1997)

Drafted team: Jets

Ferguson’s 127 starts are impressive for a player taken this late in the draft. He wasn’t asked to chase the quarterback much but did manage to rack up 21.5 sacks in his career with the Jets, Cowboys and Dolphins.

No. 230 overall: Adam Timmerman, OG, South Dakota State (1995)

Drafted team: Packers

Timmerman won a Super Bowl in his first year as a starter with the Packers, then went on to win another with the 1999 Rams. He played 12 seasons and started 172 games, making one Pro Bowl appearance in 2001.

No. 231 overall: Darryl Grant, DT, Rice (1981)

Drafted team: Redskins

Grant won two Super Bowls with Washington, including one in his second season where he contributed a pick-six in the NFC Championship Game. He played 11 seasons and started 109 games.

No. 232 overall: Julian Edelman, WR, Kent State (2009)

Drafted team: Patriots

The Patriots landed another deep sleeper in the form of Edelman, a former quarterback for the Golden Flashes. He has played 11 seasons thus far, totaling 599 receptions for 6,507 yards and 36 touchdowns while also contributing as a returner. Edelman’s three Super Bowl titles include one Super Bowl MVP award as well.

No. 233 overall: Clyde Simmons, DE, Western Carolina (1986)

Drafted team: Eagles

Simmons earned Pro Bowl and first-team All-Pro distinction in back to back years in 1991-92 for his play on the edge, and in 1992 he led the league with 19 sacks. He recorded 121.5 sacks in 236 games played, which included four double digit-sack seasons.

No. 234 overall: Will Montgomery, C, Virginia Tech (2006)

Drafted team: Panthers

Montgomery is one of only two No. 234 overall picks to serve as a primary starter for even one full season, so our choice comes down to him and Karl Lorch, both of whom made their biggest mark with Washington despite being drafted by different teams. Montgomery’s edge in starts and games played is enough to make him our pick.

No. 235 overall: Carlton Bailey, LB, North Carolina (1988)

Drafted team: Bills

Bailey spent six seasons as a primary starter for the Bills, Giants and Panthers. The ninth-round pick’s best year came in New York, where he managed 136 tackles in his first season with the team in 1993. His biggest play, however, came for the 1991 Bills, as he scored the team’s only touchdown on a pick-six to help beat the Broncos 10-7 in the AFC Championship Game.

No. 236 overall: Tom Pridemore, S, West Virginia (1978)

Drafted team: Falcons

Pridemore immediately took over as a starter for the Falcons despite his ninth-round selection, and he went on to start in 97 of his 121 games played. His 21 career interceptions were punctuated by a big 1981 campaign in which he racked up seven picks, returning one 101 yards for a score.

No. 237 overall: Todd McClure, C, LSU (1999)

Drafted team: Falcons

McClure locked down the center spot in Atlanta for 12 1/2 seasons, making 195 starts during his time with the Falcons.

No. 238 overall: Raheem Brock, DE, Temple (2002)

Drafted team: Eagles

Brock served as a starter on the Colts line for 6 1/2 seasons after failing to latch on in Philadelphia, winning a Super Bowl in 2006. He recorded 40.5 sacks in his career, with his best performance coming as a reserve in his first year in Seattle, where he piled up nine sacks.

No. 239 overall: Jeff Cross, DE, Missouri (1988)

Drafted team: Dolphins

Cross didn’t see much action as a rookie but then recorded at least 10 sacks in back-to-back years, with the latter performance earning him Pro Bowl honors after an 11.5-sack season. He played eight seasons and started 107 games, finishing his career with 59.5 sacks.

No. 240 overall: Shawn Jefferson, WR, UCF (1991)

Drafted team: Oilers

Jefferson played 13 seasons for four different teams and started 130 games. He caught 470 passes for 7,023 yards and 29 touchdowns, and he led the league with a 22.7-yard per catch average with the Patriots in 1998.

No. 241 overall: Terry Allen, RB, Clemson (1990)

Drafted team: Vikings

Allen broke out in his second season in Minnesota, but he saved his best season for Washington, where he earned Pro Bowl honors after racking up 1,353 rushing yards and a league-best 21 touchdowns on the ground. He played 11 seasons and rushed for 8,614 yards across five teams.

No. 242 overall: Brett Keisel, DE, BYU (2002)

Drafted team: Steelers

Keisel played 13 seasons and started 114 games despite not cracking the starting lineup until his age-28 season. He recorded 30 sacks and made one Pro Bowl appearance, which came during a 2010 season that featured a 79-yard pick-six for the defensive lineman.

No. 243 overall: Jason Fisk, DT, Stanford (1995)

Drafted team: Vikings

Fisk saw action in 182 games with five different teams during his career. He recovered two fumbles during the Titans’ Super Bowl run in 1999, including one in the team’s Super Bowl loss. 

No. 244 overall: Trent Brown, OT, Florida (2015)

Drafted team: 49ers

Brown has quickly emerged as a capable starter in his first five seasons despite his low draft stock. He won a Super Bowl with the Patriots in 2018 and earned his first Pro Bowl bid this past season with the Raiders.

No. 245 overall: Dave Studdard, OL, Texas (1978)

Drafted team: Colts

Studdard played 11 seasons and started 133 games, all coming with the Broncos. He even mixed in with the passing game, catching two touchdowns in his career, including one in his first season with Denver.

No. 246 overall: Charles Leno Jr., OT, Boise State (2014)

Drafted team: Bears

Leno has started 78 games in Chicago since being taken in the seventh round, providing incredible value for the BEars. He made one Pro Bowl appearance in 2018.

No. 247 overall: Garry Cobb, LB, USC (1979)

Drafted team: Cowboys

Cobb made 106 starts with three teams during his 11-year career, which including nine interceptions in a three-year span in Detroit and a career-best 7.5 sacks with the Cowboys in 1988 near the end of his playing days.

No. 248 overall: Kelvin Beachum, OT, Southern Methodist (2012)

Drafted team: Steelers

Beachum emerged as a starting-caliber offensive lineman for the Steelers despite his late draft stock, and he’s spent the last few years manning the blind side for the Jets. He has 99 career starts thus far.

No. 249 overall: Dwight Clark, WR, Clemson (1979)

Drafted team: 49ers

Clark is best known for making “The Catch” in the back of the end zone for San Francisco’s first Super Bowl victory. He was named a first-team All-Pro in the strike-shortened 1982 season when he led the league with 60 receptions and was selected to two Pro Bowls. Clark caught 506 receptions for 6,750 yards and 48 touchdowns in his career, which featured two Super Bowl wins. After his playing career, he served as director of football operations for the 49ers and Browns.

No. 250 overall: Ryan Fitzpatrick, QB, Harvard (2005)

Drafted team: Rams

The personification of journeyman quarterback, Fitzpatrick has played 15 seasons for eight different teams and started 139 games, including this past season with the Dolphins. He has nearly 33,000 passing yards to his name along with 210 passing touchdowns.

No. 251 overall: Scott Wells, C, Tennessee (2004)

Drafted team: Packers

Wells made 135 starts while playing in 146 games during his 11-year career. He earned Pro Bowl distinction in 2011, his last season in Green Bay, and he also contributed to one Super Bowl winner in his time with the Packers.

No. 252 overall: Marques Colston, WR, Hofstra (2006)

Drafted team: Saints

Colston immediately posted a 1,000-yard season as a rookie despite his draft status and then went on to deliver five more of them with the Saints. His 146-game career included 711 receptions, nearly 10,000 receiving yards and 72 touchdowns. 

No. 253 overall: Chris Goode, CB, Alabama (1987)

Drafted team: Colts

Goode came up with a few big plays during his seven-year career with the Colts, which included seven interceptions in 96 career games.

No. 254 overall: Elijah Alexander, LB, Kansas State (1992)

Drafted team: Buccaneers

Alexander exploded in Denver as a third-year player, starting all 16 games while racking up 112 tackles. While that would be his peak, he did played 10 seasons and started 76 of his 123 games played. 

No. 255 overall: Will Grant, C, Kentucky (1978)

Drafted team: Bills

Grant locked down a starting spot in Buffalo for six years, playing 10 seasons in all while starting 95 games.

No. 256 overall: Ryan Succop, K, South Carolina (2009)

Drafted team: Chiefs

Mr. Irrelevant is anything but, with an 82.2% success rate on field goals during his 11-year career so far.