Ron Rivera and the Washington Redskins did a nice job improving their roster on paper this offseason, but will they be able to prove it on the field in 2020? While the Redskins put together an impressive draft class, there still remain some question marks. Is Dwayne Haskins the future under center? Who will start opposite of Terry McLaurin? Is the secondary good enough to compete against the elite receivers in the NFC East?

The Redskins are coming off of a 3-13 campaign, but there is still plenty to be optimistic about for this upcoming season. Washington has some new weapons on offense and added more depth along the offensive line. There are also some intriguing undrafted free agents that could have a chance to make the roster as well, which is why training camp will be fun to follow. Below, we will break down what the Redskins’ 2020 depth chart will look like. Several players mentioned will not make the 53-man roster, but let’s take a look at what a rough depth chart would look like for Washington right now. 

Rookies will be denoted with a (*).

Offense

The Redskins will have some tough decisions to make concerning the running back position this offseason. Rivera went out and picked up JD McKissic and Peyton Barber in free agency, and also drafted the hybrid weapon out of Memphis, Antonio Gibson. Additionally, the Redskins have Bryce Love — who missed his entire rookie season after tearing his ACL during his last year at Stanford. He was one of college football‘s most electric weapons when healthy, so you have to imagine Washington would like to keep him on roster. 

At wide receiver, it remains to be seen what will happen to Cody Latimer after his recent arrest. If he indeed is released, there are plenty of young guys who will be able to take his spot such as Emanuel Hall or Johnathon Johnson. Right now, Kelvin Harmon is probably slated to start opposite of McLaurin, but one has to wonder if Antonio Gandy-Golden out of Liberty will end up taking his spot out wide. Either way, they both are athletic wideouts who have promising futures in this league. Tight end is another position to keep an eye one. Rivera did go out and sign Logan Thomas and Richard Rodgers in free agency, but Thaddeus Moss — the undrafted son of Randy Moss — is someone many expect to have a good chance to make an immediate impact.  

As far as the offensive line goes, only 11 players are listed even though the Redskins have many more competing for spots. If I had to guess, this number will likely be cut down to nine or so by September. After trading Trent Williams to the San Francisco 49ers during the 2020 NFL Draft, Washington selected former LSU offensive tackle Saahdiq Charles. He’s probably not someone who is going to come in and immediately serve as Haskins’ blindside blocker, but he will have a chance to compete. He’s versatile enough to play on the inside, so it’s safe to say he will get more playing time there in his first season. Overall, the Redskins’ offensive line looks decent on paper heading into 2020. You just hope that everyone can remain healthy and players like Ross Pierschbacher and Wes Martin can show some improvement in year two. 

Defense

The Redskins are making the switch from a 3-4 base defense to a 4-3 in 2020. I wouldn’t put too much stock into this defensive depth chart because it’s nearly impossible to predict what Jack Del Rio is thinking concerning his front seven. The defensive line is absolutely loaded, so don’t get hung up on Ryan Kerrigan or Matt Ioannidis being listed as a “backup.” Del Rio recently said that players are going to have to deal with “not being a starter” and learn how to work in a rotation, so I expect players like Montez Sweat, Chase Young and Kerrigan to take reps both at defensive end and outside linebacker depending on the down and distance as well as what package Del Rio wants to run.

The linebackers are tough to predict as well. Jon Bostic had a nice season as an inside backer as did rookie Cole Holcomb. The latter may have enough versatility to start on the outside, so that’s where he’s listed now. The Redskins did go out and sign veteran Thomas Davis as well, so he will be a starter either in the middle or on the weak side. Expect a breakout season from Ryan Anderson, who is finally playing in a scheme that is fitted to his liking. He is more of a 4-3 outside linebacker than a 3-4 pass rusher, so keep an eye on him. 

The cornerback position is a bit of a question mark in 2020. Kendall Fuller and Fabian Moreau are decent corners, but they aren’t exactly elite starters. Landon Collins is high on second-year corner Jimmy Moreland this season, and many are hoping he can develop into a legitimate starter. 

Special teams

The Redskins have some nice specialists in Dustin Hopkins and Tress Way, plus Sims Jr. showed potential as a returner. I’m curious to see who will challenge him in training camp — maybe it will be one of the rookies or even Moreland.